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Coquito (Puerto Rican Eggnog)

Rum and coconut milk give the Puerto Rican twist on eggnog a Caribbean flair. Smooth and creamy, this Coquito recipe is an easy drink to whip up for your holiday party guests!

Rum and coconut milk give the Puerto Rican twist on eggnog a Caribbean flair. Smooth and creamy, this Coquito recipe is an easy drink to whip up for your holiday party guests! | www.curiouscuisiniere.comMany Twists on Holiday Eggnog

While Eggnog may have originated in England, it has been adapted many ways, particularly in the States and Latin America.

Doing a little research on Latin American versions of Eggnog, you’ll find that Mexicans have Rompope, Cubans have Crema de Vie, and Puerto Ricans have Coquito.

It’s the last one that we’re talking about today.

Puerto Rican Eggnog

There is actually very little history or legend available as to the origins of the Puerto Rican version of Eggnog, Coquito (pronounced koh-KEE-toh).

Spanish and English settlers would have most likely brought their version of the drink to the Caribbean, and then started adapting it for what ingredients were readily available.

Literally translated, ‘little coconut,‘ it’s no surprise that once in the Caribbean, coconut found its way into the mix.

What also became traditionally included was canned evaporated and condensed milk.    

Now, if you’re a regular reader here at Curious Cuisiniere, you’ll know that we typically try to avoid such tinned concoctions, in favor of making everything from scratch. However, EVERY bit of research we did on Coquito pointed to the fact that the traditional way to make this drink was to pop open three cans: coconut milk, evaporated milk, and sweetened condensed milk.

So, in favor of authenticity, and simplicity, we decided to lay our “everything from scratch” tendencies aside and give this drink a try the traditional way.

It is the Holidays after all!

A Simple Coquito Recipe

When we say simple, we really mean it.

What can be more simple than pouring a few ingredients into the blender, giving it a good whir, until it picks up a little froth, and then pouring into glasses to enjoy?

It’s the perfect, easy party drink for this busy time of year.

Rum and coconut milk give the Puerto Rican twist on eggnog a Caribbean flair. Smooth and creamy, this Coquito recipe is an easy drink to whip up for your holiday party guests! | www.curiouscuisiniere.com

Eggs Or Not?

There is debate as to whether or not traditional Coquito should contain eggs.

Some say absolutely, others say absolutely not.

We’ll leave the final decision up to you, but for this version, we opted to go egg-less to make it easier to serve the drink at a party, where it may set out all evening, or bring it to a gathering to share with friends, where you might not want to lug the cooler around with you, particularly after you are all decked out in your holiday finest.

Our Coquito Recipe

Our Coquito recipe creates a lightly sweet beverage with a wonderful mingling of spices and nutty coconut.

If you like your drinks sweeter, feel free to add more sweetened condensed milk. Have fun with the flavors until they’re the way you like them!

How to Serve Coquito

Coquito is traditionally STRONG, and yes, ours follows that traditional tendency.

It’s also rich.

So, it is not a drink to fill up a cocktail glass and merrily sip the night away. (Although, if you are so inclined, be our guest.)

Traditionally Coquito is served out of shot glasses (small aperitif glasses would work too).

If you would prefer to serve it in a larger cocktail glass or rocks glass (like we did here) add an ice cube or two into the glass. This will keep the drink delightfully chilled and help cut the richness, just a bit.

Yield: 22 oz of Coquito -- Serves: 7 -10 people

Coquito (Puerto Rican Eggnog)

Rum and coconut milk give the Puerto Rican twist on eggnog a Caribbean flair. Smooth and creamy, this Coquito recipe is an easy drink to whip up for your holiday party guests! | www.curiouscuisiniere.com

Coquito, Puerto Rican eggnog, is the perfect holiday drink for a crowd! 

Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 7 oz canned coconut milk
  • 6 oz white rum
  • 6 oz evaporated milk
  • 2.5 oz sweetened condensed milk, (more to taste)
  • ½ tsp pure vanilla extract
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon, (more to serve)
  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients into the bowl of your blender. Blend until well mixed and slightly frothy, 2-3 min. Pour into a bottle and refrigerate until cold. Just before serving, blend again or simply shake well to mix and froth. Serve in chilled shot (or aperitif) glasses and sprinkle with cinnamon to serve. If using larger cocktail glasses or rocks glasses, serve over ice.
  2. Coquito will keep in a sealed jar in the refrigerator for 1 week. Shake before serving.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

7

Serving Size:

3 oz

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 192

Did you make this recipe?

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Sarah Ozimek

Sarah is co-owner of Curious Cuisiniere and the chief researcher and recipe developer for the site. Her love for cultural cuisines was instilled early by her French Canadian Grandmother. Her experience in the kitchen and in recipe development comes from years working in professional kitchens. She has traveled extensively and enjoys bringing the flavors of her travels back to create easy-to-make recipes.

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Teresa

Sunday 6th of December 2020

Can I use rum extract instead of rum so my son can have it? He’s 13. Or is there something else I can use so it will taste similar? Thanks for your help,

Sarah Ozimek

Tuesday 8th of December 2020

Hi Teresa. Yes, you could definitely use some rum extract in place of the rum. Or you could omit the rum all together and just increase the vanilla a bit. (The flavor would be slightly different, but it would still be delicious.) Enjoy!

Jerilyn

Sunday 2nd of August 2020

Thanks for this recipe!

Sarah Ozimek

Wednesday 5th of August 2020

Glad you found us! Hope you enjoy it!

Billie

Sunday 30th of December 2018

Made this for New Years, taste is great and I know it will be better tomorrow!! Thanks for sharing a "simple" receipe for my favorite beverage at the holidays!!!

Sarah Ozimek

Tuesday 1st of January 2019

So glad you enjoyed it! Happy New Year!

Karen

Monday 24th of December 2018

Going to try this receip for Christmas thank you

Sarah Ozimek

Monday 24th of December 2018

Hope you enjoy it!

Sean

Saturday 8th of December 2018

I’ve done something wrong here because mine taste like spiked baby formula. I remember having Puerto Rican eggnog years ago and thinking it was deliciious. In reading the coconut milk label it’s a blend of coconut milk and coconut water blend by Califia farms. 48 Oz bottle. I used Don Q cristal Puerto Rican rum. I followed everything exact. Should I have purchased 100 % coconut milk instead of milk/water blend? Is this the right rum. Help!!

Andrella Carlton

Friday 21st of December 2018

I prefer a high quality Coconut Milk from the refrigerated section over the canned.

EdwinV.

Saturday 15th of December 2018

Dont use coconut milk use coconut cream

Sarah Ozimek

Saturday 8th of December 2018

How interesting Sean. We're sorry you're having trouble. I would venture that it is the coconut milk being a milk/water blend that just isn't giving the right texture or flavor. Hope you can give it another try with 100% coconut milk!

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